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By putting the onus on the employee to manage their stress, corporations avoid enquiring into how they create stressful environments, stressful management structures, stressful policies, etc., in t…
January 3rd, 2018
By putting the onus on the employee to manage their stress, corporations avoid enquiring into how they create stressful environments, stressful management structures, stressful policies, etc., in the first place.

This is not so different from asking employees to become (then stay) educated, up to date, etc. rather than enquiring into how they could train people internally… thus offloading the costs of training onto employees, and limiting the risks for the corporation of having invested in the 'wrong' training (if the world evolves and the acquired skill becomes outdated much faster than initially expected).

None of that has to be a problem… if corporations also fund 'safety nets' and programs to support free/cheap education, health care, minimal universal income, etc. The risk is externalised, but so is the mechanism to deal with it constructively. The problem of course is when corporations plan for tax avoidance (when not directly tax evasion), thus for not funding such safety nets (thus funding neither risky capital nor insurance, just pushing these expenditures on others).

In relation to stress, 'funding' external safety nets for employees might e.g. mean reducing working hours, or allowing for more holidays… thus giving employees the opportunity to indeed attend (mindfully) a wider richer causal web than that inside the corporation… via volunteer work, via time with children and other dependents, via hobbies too (usually increasing awareness of inter-dependence, be it of other people involved, of the commons —infrastructure [be it for sport or culture] or natural environment). And yes, this would still also require paying a fair share of taxes, because stress might require (mental and physical) health care and other commons.
And yes, the productivity of employees who happen to have a life outside work tends to be higher than that of over-worked, overwhelmed, unhealthy, exploited slaves… so corporations might still benefit: health and enthusiasm on the job will reliably beat sickness and dragging one's feet. And that'd be the mindful way: seeing that there is a win-win scenario, if only one could refrain from perpetually thinking with zero-sum caricatures, if only one could refrain from limiting views, from the obsession of 'more money'!

We could hope that 'mindful' managers would realise this, at some point… but since they're not given (nor are taking) the time to practice / realise / make real what they learnt during their mindfulness training, this is unlikely.

#Buddhism #meditation
h/t +Steve Faktor