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«  I saw many humans on whom there were no clothes
February 18th, 2014
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illustration (attribution, if any possible, is at the end of the article)

« I saw many humans on whom there were no clothes;
   I saw many clothes in which there were no humans. »
— Rumi 


When debunking the 'view' of Hindu supremacy over Buddhism (asserting that the Buddha is an avatar of Vishnu, and that Buddhism thus brings nothing different from Hinduism), I often mention Jainism as the religion Buddhism initially grew in contact with.

Jainism offers a few sharp differences with Buddhism (e.g. on karma being related to "all acts" vs. "intentional acts", or on Ātman, or in relation to asceticism). However, the wikipedia page on Jain meditation (notably promoted by Mahāvīra, considered by some historians as a contemporary of the Buddha) should make clear that Jainism and Buddhism influenced each other:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jain_meditation


Jainism embraces asceticism, and Mahāvīra  meditated in the open without clothes and shelter, among other practices: « I saw many humans on whom there were no clothes. »

Regularly the buddhist establishment (from Theravāda to tantrism to Zen) is shaken by scandals: « I saw many clothes in which there were no humans. »

Practice, not establishment, makes the spiritual seeker.


#Buddhism  
General info on Jainism: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jainism
Photo: Jain statue, © Denis Wallez