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Several of my recent posts or comments got some feedback (public and private) about the impossibility / impracticability of practicing the pāramitās or of holding the bodhisattva vow(s); this was a…
March 5th, 2013 (December 3rd, 2013)
illustration

illustration (attribution, if any possible, is at the end of the article)

Several of my recent posts or comments got some feedback (public and private) about the impossibility / impracticability of practicing the pāramitās or of holding the bodhisattva vow(s); this was anticipated.

Somehow our world would supposedly not allow us to be generous without being abused, to be patient without being weak, to be perseverant without being stupid, to be ethical without being a 'looser', to be wise without disappearing in some mythical protected far-away land (likely to be mountainous or encircled by a forest)…

I replied to a few points, notably pointing that status quo is karma (and to reduce 'karma' to an outdated antique Indian myth —rather than a notion relevant in our modern circumstances— is just another attempt to preserve the said status quo) but +mike edelman just provided another presentation masterfully covering all points at once: if 'karma' is status quo, it is also 'mindset'!


#Buddhism   #engagedbuddhism   #buddhistcircle  
Bodhisattva vow(s):    http://gplus.wallez.name/Asnsd7UxggZ
Six pāramitās:              http://gplus.wallez.name/FE7UwdSnTXq
On wealth inequality:  http://gplus.wallez.name/jHNH7gybmks
Proposed complementary reading: "Buddhist ethics" by J. Garfield
                     http://www.academia.edu/2833485/Buddhist_Ethics 
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by :
It's Called Mindset

As a person was passing the elephants, he suddenly stopped, confused by the fact that these huge creatures were being held only by only a rope tied to their legs. It was obvious that the elephants could, at anytime, break away from the ropes they were tied to but for some reason, they did not. This person saw a trainer nearby and asked why these beautiful, magnificent animals just stood there and made no attempt to escape.

"Well," he said, "when they are very young and much smaller we use the same size rope to tie them and at that age, it's enough to hold them. As they grow up they are conditioned to believe they cannot break away. They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free." This person was amused. These animals could at any time break free from their bonds but because they believed they couldn't, they were stuck right where they were. This powerful and gigantic creature has limited it's present abilities by the limitations of it's past.

Like the elephants, how many of us go through life holding onto a belief that we cannot do something, simply because we failed before? How many of us refuse to attempt something new and challenging because of our so called mindset?

Choose not to accept the false boundaries and limitations created by the past...