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«  A moment of anger meets the thought  “One must not be angry (because this event or empty, or in order…
October 9th, 2013
illustration

illustration (attribution, if any possible, is at the end of the article)

« A moment of anger meets the thought  "One must not be angry (because this event or empty, or in order to realize emptiness, and so on)." By the even application of the three truths, in one sense both the anger and the moral imperative are deluded thoughts, in another sense the anger is being corrected and enlightened by the moral imperative, in another sense the moral imperative is being corrected and enlightened by its encounter with anger. The anger is a bodhisattva, as is the moral restriction, both assuming deluded forms to enlighten the other and all else. Each is biased in its own way and the bias of the one corrects the bias of the other »
— Brook Ziporyn, "What is the Buddha looking at?" (in "Buddhism in the Sung" edited by P. Gregory and D. Getz)


The "three truths" are a T'ien-t'ai extension of the "two truths."

The above is very compatible with what I was addressing in "doing one's best" (gplus.wallez.name/Tnx1pJdhsvv): reality is your friend, as it corrects the excess of 'idealism'. Reality is neither inclusive nor exclusive of mind-based phenomena and ideas. The Middle Path is found in "seeing things as they are." Seeing is not separate from mind… so this is neither a call for pure 'subjectivity' nor a call for pure 'objectivity'. Creatively engage with both; don't suppress thoughts, don't deny reality…


#Buddhism