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If one remembers that karma  [業] in Buddhism relates to volition  and volitional tendencies/habits (rather than to retribution), the attached post is marvellous!
September 23rd, 2013
illustration

illustration (attribution, if any possible, is at the end of the article)

If one remembers that karma  [業] in Buddhism relates to volition  and volitional tendencies/habits (rather than to retribution), the attached post is marvellous!


#karma   #Buddhism  
by M Sinclair Stevens:
Kanji: Will, Intent  
This kanji is associated with the concepts of will, intention, attention, purpose, and meaning. In Japanese, it is pronounced "i" (ee).

It is composed of two other kanji: sound 「音」and heart 「心」. If one listens to the sound of one's heart (metaphorically), one attains consciousness or awareness 「意識」[ishiki] which enables you to form opinions 「意見」[iken]. (How do you see it in your mind's eye?)

Your opinions express which way you lean on a topic; that is, tells us about your inclinations 「意向」[ikou] (in Japanese, it's literally which way you face) and perhaps even your intentions  「意図」[ito].  When your will, volition, and desire  「意欲」[iyoku] are strong enough you can act with resolve or determination 「決意」(ketsui).

If you pay attention 「注意」[chui] you can alway act in a thoughtful and purposeful way,  with goodwill 「好意」[koui] and sincerity [誠意」[seii]. If not, you will get a reputation for being ill-natured 「意地悪」[ijiwaru].

Actions that are unexpected, unforeseen, or surprising seem that way because they are unintentional 「意外な」[igai na] (literally outside or beyond the bounds of willful action). Faced with unforeseen disaster, some question whether a purposeless universe has any meaning 「意味」[imi] (literally, the flavor of one's intentions...I like how that colors the meaning).

#kanji