Latest post:

There is something funny about how some people are attached to the pronunciation of their name. A name…
January 10th, 2012
There is something funny about how some people are attached to the pronunciation of their name. A name is just a practical, simple, efficient convention to disambiguate a situation; it's a mere label. It works, it's a very useful convention, but it's not who you are. So clinging to the name itself or, worse, to a particular pronunciation is irrelevant and pointless. [Like any clinging, it can only lead to suffering, usually in the form of irritation and annoyance in this case, when other people "keep forgetting."]

Associations based on one's name during childhood may influence who one becomes, by establishing links to a religious saint or a pop star, to the family history, to a fictitious or historical character... How the name sounds may generate some influence too. It generally works by implicitly setting expectations (and acting as a reminder of them). But the associations and the (parental) expectations, not the name itself, are what conditions the emerging persona.

A name - as a fixed label - conveys (and contributes to) the illusion of permanence of the ego. We're nothing permanent, we're constantly changing, adapting, accumulating, losing, remembering, forgetting... Our dreams and aversions evolve. It may still be practical to use a conventional view of people: although people constantly change, most do not change too dramatically overnight... People are never the same, but most of the time they're almost the same, in a way. So conventional views may still be useful and relevant. Names are the same: they can be a useful tool. Just don't get too attached to yours.